Birthday boy Matthew’s close shave for charity

Picture 26/08/15 Emma Mitchell.'Matthew Lowrie (11) and pals who shaved his head for cancer research. Mathew with brother Sean and his friends Paul MCmullan and Lachlan Frame.
Picture 26/08/15 Emma Mitchell.'Matthew Lowrie (11) and pals who shaved his head for cancer research. Mathew with brother Sean and his friends Paul MCmullan and Lachlan Frame.

A Lenzie youngster enlisted the help of some scissor-happy school pals for a hair-raising birthday party in aid of cancer research.

Matthew Lowrie (11) decided to cut off all his locks to raise money for the cause after his grandfather was struck down by the disease.

When he asked his friends at Holy Family Primary School if they would do the honours during his birthday sleepover, they were only too happy to oblige.

So far, Matthew’s head shave has raised more than £550 for Cancer Research UK.

Mum Joanne said: “Matthew did the ice bucket challenge on his birthday last year and was trying to think about something to do this year to raise money for charity.

“He asked me if I would let him shave his head and I agreed.”

She added: “He decided to donate the money to Cancer Research UK because both his grandfather and godfather were struck by cancer in the past few years.

“Luckily they survived but Matthew know I had a few uncles who unfortunately passed away due to cancer.

“He was having a sleepover for his 11th birthday with a few school friends and we thought we could get them involved, so they all got a chance to shave a part of his head.

“We set up a just giving page where people could donate online and also set up a text service where they can text an amount to the page.

“So far Matthew has raised over £550 for cancer research UK and we still have donations coming in.

People can still donate to Matthew’s charity page at www.justgiving.com/joanne-lowrie1

At the moment, half of all people diagnosed with cancer will survive. On its website, Cancer Research UK says its ambition is to accelerate progress and see three-quarters of people surviving the disease within the next 
20 years.