Kirkintilloch church lands bumper Lottery boost

St Mary's Parish Church

St Mary's Parish Church

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St Mary’s Parish Church in Kirkintilloch is one of a number of Scottish churches to share in a bumper cash windfall.

Over £1.5million has been awarded to them through the grants for Places of Worship programme, a partnership between Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) and Historic Environment Scotland.

It’s been reported that St Mary’s will receive a grant of more than £200,000.

As well as making the churches wind and watertight, the funding will be used to delve into their history and share it with the community and visitors through events, publications and digital media. Many will also train volunteers to give guided tours.

From a church modelled on the hull of a boat, to a spire used as a navigational fix, to the first cathedral to be built in the UK after the reformation, the seven places of worship to benefit from the funding are:

Shettleston New Parish Church Glasgow

St Michael’s Kirk, Inveresk

Paisley Central Methodist Hall

St Mungo’s Parish Church, Alloa

St Anne’s Church, Dunbar

St Ninian’s Cathedral, Perth

St Mary’s Parish Church, Kirkintilloch

St Ninian’s Episcopal Church, Glen Urquhart

Lucy Casot, Head of HLF Scotland, said: “Scotland’s amazing array of churches provide a focus for many community activities particularly at this time of year. We are delighted that, working in partnership with Historic Environment Scotland, we are able to help these congregations secure the future of their buildings. Not only will they be wind and watertight but activities and events will reach out to new generations encouraging many more through their doors.”

“We are delighted that, working in partnership with Historic Environment Scotland, we are able to help these congregations secure the future of their buildings.”

Frazer Gibson, Project Officer for Historic Environment Scotland, added: “Throughout the centuries, Scottish society has been intrinsically linked with religion, with the local place of worship often forming the focal point of communities.

“As a result, a great deal of resource has been expended throughout those years to create some of the country’s most important and carefully constructed buildings.

“Nowadays many continue to serve as a hub for the communities they serve, but they can also be appreciated for their aesthetic value and historical importance. Places of worship are undoubtedly a vital part of Scotland’s built heritage, and we are very happy to be able to contribute towards their repair and restoration, along with our partners in HLF.”