DCSIMG

Snow joke – wardens needed to keep communities moving

7.12.12 Photograph Jamie Forbes. Kirkintilloch. Monklands Avenue. 77 year old Morris McCabe scraping the ice off his path and the pavement.

7.12.12 Photograph Jamie Forbes. Kirkintilloch. Monklands Avenue. 77 year old Morris McCabe scraping the ice off his path and the pavement.

SNOW and ice on pavements will be tackled a priority basis in East Dunbartonshire, but ‘snow angels’ are being invited to do their bit.

The council unveiled plans for a ‘Snow Wardens’ community self-help initiative in October and local groups are being urged to sign up.

The scheme involves volunteers being trained to take responsibility for clearing snow and gritting pavements in their neighbourhoods.

The council’s focus is on the major routes, which sometimes means smaller communities don’t receive as much help as they would like.

Community councils or other established groups can join the Snow Warden scheme.

When the initiative was launched, Derek Cunningham – director of development and infrastructure – said: “The idea is for residents to volunteer to work with the council to help us get people and traffic moving as quickly as possible at a local level, on roads and paths, when we need support.

“With a team of local people volunteering and working with us we can do more and act faster. It is about the community coming together to help each other.”

Local residents contacted the Herald recently to voice concerns over gritting – particularly pavements and side roads.

Isabella Hagan (65), who lives in Waverley Crescent, Kirkintilloch, said: “They only put salt on one half of the crescent.

“When I spoke to the workers they said that was council policy. People are having to sit in their homes. It’s a disgrace.”

Keith Scrimgeour, roads and neighbourhood services manager, said: “Like carriageways we have priority footpath routes throughout our network.

“These cover areas like main shopping areas, town centres, the busiest locations near to schools, health centres, sheltered housing and busy thoroughfares.

“Unfortunately, with the resources available our priorities are to keep these strategic footways clear of snow and ice, and as resources permit we will try to address the remainder of the network.

“If snow wardens were involved during inclement weather then the more assistance we have would be for everyone’s benefit.”

It is understood community councils have now been consulted on Snow Wardens and if the public is interested in going ahead, the scheme will be introduced.

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