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Special occasion for village school

St Machan's Cheque Presentation

St Machan's Cheque Presentation

A village school has celebrated its 50th anniversary with a special mass and charity presentation.

The Reverend Archbishop Leo Cushley joined past and present teachers, parents and pupils at St Machan’s Primary School, in Lennoxtown, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the school building - which originally opened at the foot of the Campsie Fells in 1964.

Canon Conway, Father Tracey and Father Murray also joined in the celebrations.

The theme of the mass was praise and thanksgiving so the hall was decorated with images from the Psalms created by pupils.

At the end of mass, the Archbishop was given a beautiful photo of the Campsie Hills, taken by primary six pupil Finan Carey, along with a special music CD made by the children.

A cheque for £1,350 was also handed over to Dominic Sutherland of the Malawi partnership.

The cash will be donated to partner school St Katete in southeast Africa.

Head teacher Julie Harvey said: “The money was raised through a coffee morning which has become an annual event at St Machan’s, run by the PTA.

“Entertainment is also provided by the children who sing Burns songs for guests. Mr Sutherland is planning to visit Malawi and will ensure the money raised is put to good use.”

St Machan’s Primary originally occupied premises built back in 1857.

The school building was on land known as ‘Greenhead’ - near where Greenhead Road is today.

In the 19th century it was called St Paul’s School, until the Reverend John Magini was appointed to the church in 1866 and requested that the name be changed to St Machan’s - in honour of the patron saint who the nearby church at Clachan of Campsie was also named after.

The original building accommodated 90 pupils, but the capacity was increased to 207 in 1873.

Further extensions were carried out in 1884 and 1926, with upgrading carried out in 1928-29.

Pupils and teachers then moved to the current building, in St Machan’s Way, in 1964, where the school has remained ever since.

 

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