Residents up in arms over greenbelt plan

20-11-2014'Torrance, Hugh Kershaw Community Council Activist protesting over houses being built on greenbelt land.'Picture Paul McSherry.
20-11-2014'Torrance, Hugh Kershaw Community Council Activist protesting over houses being built on greenbelt land.'Picture Paul McSherry.

More than 250 people attended a heated public 
meeting last week to protest at plans for a major development on greenbelt land.

The meeting was organised by Torrance Community Council, who are against a proposal to build 140 homes on fields at Tower Road in the village.

Hugh Kershaw, chairman of the community council, told the Herald: “It was quite clear from the meeting that the plan to build on greenbelt land was rejected by those present.

“There was not one favourable comment about the project.”

It is believed the housing plan by developers Hallam Land Management will come before the council’s planning committee shortly.

The public meeting was held as part of the developers pre-planning application process.

As well as the objection to building on previously protected land, protestors say the development is too big for the area and the infrastructure could not cope. Currently there are around 900 homes in the village.

Protestors claim the proposed new homes would mean a 20 per cent rise in the village population. Traffic congestion around the village school and Main Street shops was also a concern, along with “inadequate” public transport.

On their Facebook Page, the community council urges people to join them and let East Dunbartonshire Council know that development on the greenbelt is not acceptable.

Thomas Glen, director of development and regeneration at East Dunbartonshire Council said: “A Proposal of Application Notice, TP/ED/14/0654, was submitted by Geddes Consulting on behalf of Hallam Land Management on September 1 this year.

“This was for around 140 houses for the land east of Tower Road and south of Tower Farm, Torrance.

“The council, as planning authority, is required to advertise all such notices when submitted by developers.

“This gives the planning authority and local community a minimum of 12 weeks notice before the developer can submit a planning application. Within this 12-week period the developer is required to carry out pre-application consultation.

“The council would always encourage the local community to take the opportunity to provide comment on any such proposal notice.”