We’re sick and tyred of all this fly-tipping!

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A MOUNTAIN of rubbish has appeared on the site of an abandoned building in Bishopbriggs – just along the road from an official dump site.

The eyesore on Balmuildy Road, next to the Wilderness Plantation, has become known for attracting illegal fly-tippers.

East Dunbartonshire Council has been contacted by angry locals who want something done about the issue.

Concerned resident Ian McPherson highlighted the need to protect the Wilderness Plantation.

He said: “The mound is now more than two metres high and about 15 metres square, and appears to consist of builders’ rubble, tyres and general rubbish. Why has this eyesore been allowed to persist and grow?

“It is ironic that the official local waste disposal and recycling depot is but a few hundred metres along the road. A suitable lorry, two men and the appropriate equipment could clear this mess in an hour.”

Dr McPherson added: “The Wilderness Plantation and the other green spaces in a built-up area like Bishopbriggs are a precious resource.

“The Plantation is home to increasingly rare wildlife such as buzzards and roe deer.

“Despite this the council seem happy to see assorted waste items strewn about the woodlands, abandoned buildings left to decay and, of course, the aforesaid pile festering and growing visibly from day to day.”

Another resident, Karen Stirling, labelled the site an eyesore and is concerned about the message to visitors.

However, David Devine, head of roads and neighbourhood services at the council, said: “This area of land and the adjoining property are not owned by East Dunbartonshire and as such the council is currently pursuing the owners to ensure the necessary action is taken to clear the area.”

Concerned East Dunbartonshire MP Jo Swinson has written to the council calling for action.

She told the Herald: “It is very frustrating when people do not make use of the waste and recycling facilities available, and instead leave rubbish lying about, creating an eyesore.”