SLIDESHOW: Ghostly goings on in at Glasgow Academy Milngavie

Ghouls, goblins and ghosts all came out to play at The Glasgow Academy Milngavie last week when pupils dressed up for Hallowe’en.

They danced along the catwalk in a fantastic array of costumes to some spooky Hallowe’en music and tried to scare their parents and grandparents who were watching them from the audience.

Glasgow Academy Milngavie, Mugdock Road - Hallowe'en Parade. Teacher Ms Annette Osterrberg.

Glasgow Academy Milngavie, Mugdock Road - Hallowe'en Parade. Teacher Ms Annette Osterrberg.

The children also enjoyed Hallowe’en parties at the school when they got the chance to play the traditional game of ‘dooking’ for apples.

The game is played by filling a tub or a large basin with water and putting apples in the water.

The apples float to the surface and the players then try to catch one with their teeth.

They are not allowed to use their arms, and often they are tied behind the back to prevent cheating.

The children also made scary bats and ghosts as decorations and ate monkey nuts and tangerines.

One of the dads, Mr Osbourne, carved two fantastic pumpkin lanterns for the school to display - which added to the atmosphere.

It is widely believed that many Hallowe’en traditions originated from Celtic harvest festivals which may have pagan roots, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain, and that this festival was Christianised as Hallowe’en.

Hallowe’en activities include trick-or-treating (or guising in Scotland), attending Hallowe’en costume parties, carving pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories and watching horror films.

The word “Hallowe’en” means “hallowed evening” or “holy evening”. It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows’ Eve (the evening before All Hallows’ Day).