Vehicle safety notices – Mercedes, Renault and Volkswagen recall vehicles

Vehicle safety notices – Mercedes, Renault and Volkswagen recall vehicles
Vehicle safety notices – Mercedes, Renault and Volkswagen recall vehicles

Major car makers Mercedes, Renault and Volkswagen have recalled cars in the last month due to airbag problems, faulty throttles and concerns over seat belt components.

Vehicle recalls are common in the automotive industry and are generally a result of the Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA), or the manufacturer determining that a fault in a vehicle constitutes a safety defect. According to the DVSA Code of Conduct, a car must be recalled if: “a failure due to design and/or construction, is likely to affect the safe operation of the product/aftermarket part without prior warning to the user and may pose a significant risk to the driver, occupants and others. This defect will be common to a number of products/aftermarket parts that have been sold for use in the United Kingdom”.

Among the key recalls since the start of February were:

Mercedes-Benz

Models affected: C-Class, S-Class, E-Class Coupe, GLC built between 02/04/2016 and 01/04/2017

Concern: Front seat belt tensioners may not function

Description: The front seatbelt pre-tensioner ignitors may not perform as expected. This could increase the risk of injury to the seat occupants. The lock function of the seatbelts is not impaired.

Remedial action: On affected vehicles replace seatbelts with quality assured units.

Vehicle Id: WDD2050042R238833 to WDD2054482F448686; WDD2533052F148543 to WDD2539092F155868; WDD2220322A293012 to WDD2229762A296676

Models affected: A-Class built between 02/05/2017 and 01/06/2017, GLE/GLS, GLE Coupe

Concern: Bonding of the windshield may be inadequate

Description: The bonding of the windshield in the lower area may not correspond to the specification. During a collision the bonding may fail and the windscreen may detach. This could have an adverse effect on the effectiveness of the passenger airbag.

Remedial action: On affected vehicles check bonding and if necessary replace windscreen.

Vehicle Id: WDD1760082J636886 to WDD1760122J637567; WDC1660242A775554 to WDC1660242A775554 ;WDC2923241A040346 to WDC2923241A040346

Renault

Models affected: Zoe built between 13/07/2017 and 19/10/2017

Concern: Incorrect throttle pedal fitted

Description: An incorrect accelerator pedal may be fitted which could cause discomfort or in extreme circumstances the pedal may get suck under the floor mat.

Remedial action: Recall the vehicles that are likely to be affected and check the accelerator pedal fitted. Replace the pedal where necessary.

Vehicle Id: VF1AGVYB058633921 to VF1AGVYF158597568

Volkswagen

Models affected: Golf, Golf Estate and Golf SV built between 02/07/2014 and 15/11/2014

Concern: Passenger airbag may not deploy as intended

Description: There is a possible faulty weld to the gas generator. If the airbag is deployed, there is a potential danger to the vehicle occupants by gas generator parts being ejected into the cabin.

Remedial action: Recall the vehicles that are likely to be affected and replace the airbag inflator unit.

Vehicle Id: WVWZZZAUZFP013177 to WVWZZZAUZFW099518; WVWZZZAUZFP013177 to WVWZZZAUZFW099518; WVWZZZAUZFW526685 to WVWZZZAUZFW527221

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